WANG Chao (王超)

Male, 26, office worker at Beijing Zhongguancun Sitong Company. From: Beijing.

Late at night on June 3, 1989, Wang went to watch the protests. He was in the Muxidi area when he was shot. The bullet hit him in the head. His was Unidentified Body No. 3 at the Navy Hospital. Wang had just gotten married, and his wedding reception was scheduled to be held in early June. Wang’s ashes are kept at Jinshan Cemetery near Fragrant Hills.

Wang’s mother, Wang Huirong (王惠蓉), is a member of the Tiananmen Mothers.

WANG Chao (王超)
王超
Wang Chao
Office Worker
Wang Huirong, mother of Wang Chao, said in a video interview in 2019:

Back then, when my son went to watch the parade . . . I was also sympathetic toward the movement. To oppose corruption—of course the common people must oppose corruption. It is only right. . . . Innocent people like those children were only doing this for the future of their motherland: Oppose bureaucratism and corruption is only right. The historic May Fourth Movement . . . was good, because it enabled society to advance. This movement itself was righteous, so why suppress it? At that time, children and students opposed corruption, I think the movement was necessary and it attracted society’s attention. Our leaders should make China a truly democratic and free country, and liberalize and modernize China. Even though Deng Xiao Ping had achieved a great deal, firing at the people was absolutely wrong! I personally witnessed it, because the majority of the staff of our Science Academy were also watching outside. In the Muxidi area, vehicle after armored vehicle were followed by troops who started firing. And there were even tanks. My son was shot dead, straight in the head. Honestly, my son was just joining in the crowd—he didn’t do anything. He had been busy at work. He was doing computer work. . . . I think he had a sense of justice and was trying to see what this movement was about. What is so strange about that? Why fire and shoot at your own citizens?

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